2014/04/01

The road is paved with good intentions (Tuesdays with Dorie BwJ: Potato Lefse)

The road to Tuesdays (with Dorie) is paved with good intentions.

The potatoes were prepped and ready to go for a Sunday afternoon cook off. I had every intention of turning these into a pre-dinner snack. Or something...

And then, life happened.

The girl was inviting guests over. House chores had to be done. Dinner plans had to be changed.

Sunday became Monday. Work happened. Doctor's appointments happened. Sick kids happened. The pot of macaroni & cheese left on the stove with the burner on for many hours happened (by aforementioned sick kid).

At 8:00 PM Monday night, potato lefse finally happened. And promptly went into the freezer to finish happening another day.

Reality isn't very pretty, isn't it?


Because this was a Beatrice Ojakangas recipe, I knew I couldn't pass it up (nor did I want to ruin my 100% participation status in TWD/BwJ). I am a pretty big fan of Mrs. Ojakangas - her books the Great Scandinavian Baking Book and The Great Holiday Baking Book [3 gold stars for this one] are both pretty stellar and worthy of shelf space. The Best Casserole Book Ever is solid as well. Her recently released The Soup and Bread Cookbook is also finding some good use in my kitchen.

In case you aren't familiar, potato lefse are essentially a soft crepe/pancake-like flat bread. Cooked potatoes are run through a food mill (or ricer), blended with cream, butter, sugar, salt and allowed to hang out in the refrigerator for a day or so. Eventually, some flour is worked in to make a dough and the lefse are divided up into balls of dough and rolled out and fried in a hot griddle.

With a little bit of patience, they aren't too difficult to make (see above for my lefse survival kit - the tools are not really traditional, but they work - especially the tool hanging out in the top left hand corner...). If you have flour and can roll out a round of dough reasonably well, this is totally doable. A thick spatula and steady hands made the whole transferring to the pan & flipping the lefse over part work (as long as you are careful with your fingers when arranging the dough in the very hot cast iron skillet...)

The end result was a very soft flat bread that seems like it would be perfect for all sorts of fillings - both sweet and savory (one site even recommended hot dogs, if that's your thing).

One of these days, I will play around with those disks hanging out in my freezer. Good intentions and all that, you know?

Peace out. XO


This post participates in Tuesdays with Dorie. Beatrice Ojakangas posted a recipe for potato lefse here on her blog.

17 comments:

  1. Life does happen! Good for you for sticking with it. I think you will enjoy them when you defrost and don't have sick kids :)

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  2. Life absolutely happens, especially with kids around!! We just have to go with the flow and get back to the fun things in time. :)

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  3. Okay, do this. Pack your nightgown, a t-shirt and shorts. Go to the airport. Buy a ticket to San Luis Obispo. The agent will figure it out. Get on the plane. Tell me the time to meet you. The Lefse will wait.

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  4. I decided to stop the insanity of double posting, so I skipped this recipe today. You're a gem for your 100% participation...and after your rave review, I may have to try this on a make up week :)

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  5. I recently found a pot on the store that had been left on all night. By an adult. So sick kid has an excuse. Come to think of it, the adult is sick too. Maybe sick people ought not cook... I think I'll meet Mary in San Luis Obispo.

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  6. 100% participation??? Wow! Yes, life happens, and the tool that begins with "W" is essential. xoxo

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  7. With life happening the only thing is perseverance and you certainly did a good job with that ;)

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  8. Hey, you pulled it off - kudos to you! These sound really good & I'll definitely check out the other books you recommended - I can't get enough good soup & bread recipes.

    Hope your daughter is feeling better! Hugs!

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  9. Dang, I totally missed the most important tool (top left hand corner). :) hee hee.
    Glad you got to make them. And nice to have them in the freezer to pull out whenever you want. Here's hoping that life settles down soon.

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  10. I haven’t made these yet…I’ve been totally off schedule this week. After reading your review, I’m looking forward to the challenge! They sound yummy!

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  11. Wish I had some in the freezer too! Good work getting that far in your endeavors this week. Hope it gets easier...

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  12. I love Beatrice Ojakangas, too--she's so cute and sweet. I don't have her holiday book, but I'll take a look for it online. Hope you get to eat those lefse up soon!

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  13. Let us know how the lefse taste once the dough has been frozen. At one point I lost patience with the dough and was considering the freezer. Yes for good intentions!

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  14. I am so impressed by your effort! I was planning on making these on Monday, but when I re-read the recipe around noon I decided they'd have to wait for a make-up week.

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  15. Looks pretty good! I will eventually get around to this when life slows down.

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  16. Hope life has slowed down a bit by now, and all are healthy, or at least on the mend. Lucky you to have these in the freezer - we enjoyed these. Will definitely make again.

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  17. I've been wanting to try these. Soon. life is crazy. That's why we have wine.

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